About

Under the leadership of playwright, actor, and director Kwame Kwei-Armah OBE (Artistic Director) and national arts leader Stephen Richard (Managing Director), Center Stage is an artistically driven institution committed to engaging, entertaining, and enriching audiences of today and tomorrow through joyous and bold performance. The professional, nonprofit theater company is dedicated to the creation and presentation of a dynamic and diverse array of new and classic work, and each year hosts an audience of more than 100,000 in its historic home in Baltimore’s Mount Vernon neighborhood. With its signature focus on civic and community engagement, Center Stage, The State Theater of Maryland, enters its second 50 years with a commitment to exploring how art and entertainment communicate in the 21st century, and to igniting conversation in Baltimore and beyond.

Our Mission Statement

Center Stage is an artistically driven institution committed to engaging, educating, and expanding the horizons of diverse audiences through challenging, bold, thought-provoking classical and contemporary theater.

Values central to our mission are:

  • Rigorous pursuit of excellence
  • Courage to take risks
  • Commitment to diversity and inclusion
  • Belief in continual learning, exploration, and discovery
  • Fiscal integrity

Finances

 


Artistic Director—Kwame Kwei-Armah 

Kwame Kwei-Armah OBE, an award-winning British playwright, director, actor, and broadcaster, is in his third season as Artistic Director of Center Stage in Baltimore, Maryland. At Center Stage he has directed The Mountaintop; An Enemy of the People; The Whipping Man (one of City Paper’s Top Ten Productions of 2012), for which he was named Best Director; and Naomi Wallace’s Things of Dry Hours. Among his works as playwright are Elmina’s Kitchen and Let There Be Love—which had their American debuts at Center Stage—as well as A Bitter Herb, Statement of Regret, and Seize the Day. His latest play, Beneatha’s Place, debuted at Center Stage in 2013 as part of the ground-breaking Raisin Cycle. His other directorial credits include Let There be Love and Seize the Day at the Tricycle Theatre, the World Premiere of Detroit ’67 at The Public Theater, and the World Premiere of The Liquid Plain at Oregon Shakespeare Festival. Kwame has served on the boards of The National Theatre and The Tricycle Theatre, both in London. He served as Artistic Director for the World Arts Festival in Senegal, a month-long World Festival of Black Arts and Culture, which featured more than two thousand artists from 52 countries participating in 16 different arts disciplines. He was named the Chancellor of the University of the Arts London, and in 2012 was named an Officer of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire. Follow Kwame on Twitter. Friend him on Facebook.

  Managing Director—Stephen Richard 

Stephen Richard, a leader on the national arts scene for more than 30 years, joined Center Stage in January 2012 as the theater’s new Managing Director. Stephen comes most recently from a position as Vice President, External Relations, for the new National Children’s Museum. Previously, he served 18 years as Executive Director of Arena Stage, where he planned and managed the theater’s $125 million capital campaign for the Mead Center for American Theater. Also a professor at Georgetown University and George Mason University, he has served on the boards and committees of some of the nation’s most prestigious arts organizations, including the National Endowment for the Arts, American Arts Alliance, League of Resident Theatres, and Theatre Communications Group.

The 2013-14 Center Stage Board of Trustees

Robert W. Smith, Jr., President
Edward C. Bernard, Vice President
Juliet Eurich, Vice President
Terry H. Morgenthaler, Vice President
E. Follin Smith, Treasurer
Topper Webb, Secretary


Penny Bank
Katharine C. Blakeslee*
James T. Brady
C. Sylvia Brown*
Stephanie Carter
August J. Chiasera
Janet Clauson
Lynn Deering
Jed Dietz
Walter B. Doggett, III
Jane W.I. Droppa
Brian Eakes
Beth W. Falcone
Daniel Gahagan
C. Richard Gamper, Jr.
Suzan Garabedian
Carole Goldberg
Adam Gross


Cheryl O'Donnell Guth
Martha Head
Elizabeth Hurwitz
Kathleen W. Hyle
Ted E. Imes
Murray M. Kappelman, MD*
John J. Keenan
E. Robert Kent, Jr.
Joseph M. Langmead*
Kenneth C. Lundeen*
Marilyn Meyerhoff*
Hugh Mohler
J. William Murray
Charles E. Noell
Esther Pearlstone*
Judy M. Phares
Jill Pratt
Philip J. Rauch



Harold Rojas
Monica Sagner*
Renee C. Samuels
Todd Schubert
Charles Schwabe
George M. Sherman*
Scott Somerville
Scot T. Spencer
Michael B. Styer
Harry Thomasian
Donald Thoms
Katherine Vaughns+
Cheryl Hudgins Williams
Linda S. Woolf


*Trustees Emeriti

+Center Stage honors the legacy of Katherine Vaughns and her many contributions as a Trustee, patron, donor, and friend of our theater.

History

Launched in 1963 by an ambitious community drama group, Center Stage soon became a leader in the regional theater movement, working to produce first-rate professional theater in communities across America. Along with theaters like The Guthrie Theater in Minneapolis, Arena Stage in Washington, and Alley Theatre in Houston, Center Stage changed the way Americans experience serious theater.

In the years since its founding, Center Stage has not only survived its growing pains—including a potentially disastrous arson fire in 1974—it has become Baltimore’s leading professional producing theater, welcoming nearly 100,000 people each season to our award-winning facility in Baltimore’s historic Mt. Vernon Cultural District. Center Stage produces a wide variety of events each season, presented in two intimate state-of-the-art auditoriums: the 541-seat Pearlstone Theater and the flexible-configuration 298-seat Head Theater. Center Stage continues to attract the finest actors, directors, and designers from all over the country.

With history and the national press on our side—The Wall Street Journal called the theater “a model of what regional theater can and should be”—Center Stage holds fast to its original goal of putting art before commerce. Accordingly, while production quality is high, prices are low. Season memberships start at $60, and single tickets cost as little as $10. The theater even offers Pay-What-You- Can days, when theatergoers literally set their own ticket prices.

In addition to educational programs for students and teachers, Center Stage offers a variety of special series designed to enhance the theater-going experience. These programs are just a slice of the broad behind-the-scenes commitments to diversity, community, entrepreneurial spirit, and audience service that support our artistic mission.

The 20-year tenure of Artistic Director Irene Lewis was one of explosive growth. Creative work—whether classics, new plays, or musical theater pieces—involves collaborative teams of emerging and established artists who create theater that confronts the universal and often difficult questions we all face. Recognizing that a broadly representative audience of diverse individuals heightens the experience of theater, Lewis made diversity on stage, on the staff, and in the audience a central institutional priority.

The 2011-12 Season marked the arrival of new Artistic Director Kwame Kwei-Armah, an internationally recognized playwright, director, and arts advocate. Even in periods of economic downturn, Center Stage has maintained a record of break-even or better operation, and our future is as inspiring as our past. Under the new leadership of Kwei-Armah, Center Stage continues to offer challenging, bold work onstage, enhanced by extensive community engagement to ensure its position as Baltimore’s preeminent professional theater company.

Past Productions

2010-Present

2012-13: Kwame Kwei-Armah, Artistic Director

    The Raisin Cycle
  • Clybourne Park by Bruce Norris. Directed by Derrick Sanders
  • Beneatha's Place World Premiere by Kwame Kwei-Armah. Directed by Derrick Sanders
  • Expanding the Cycle: Play Reading Festival. Smart People by Lydia Diamond, The Luck of the Irish by Kirsten Greenidge, Etiquette of Vigilance by Robert O'Hara

2011-12: Kwame Kwei-Armah, Artistic Director

  • The Second City Charmed and Dangerous In a world-premiere commission for Center Stage Created by The Second City Additional material created by Ed Furman and Tim Sniffen Additional Original Music Composed by Matthew Loren Cohen Directed by Matt Hovde
  • The Rivals by Richard Brinsley Sheridan Directed by David Schweizer
  • American Buffalo by David Mamet Directed by Liesl Tommy
  • Gleam by Bonnie Lee Moss Rattner Based on the novel "Their Eyes Were Watching God" by Zora Neale Hurston Directed by Marion McClinton
  • A Skull in Connemara by Martin McDonagh Directed by BJ Jones
  • Into the Woods Music and Lyrics by Stephen Sondheim Book by James Lapine Directed by Mark Lamos A co-production with Westport Country Playhouse
  • The Whipping Man by Matthew Lopez Directed by Kwame Kwei-Armah
  • Play Lab Dance: Jawole Willa Jo Zollar and Liz Lerman
  • Holiday Cabaret
  • March Cabaret Madness: Songs of the 70s with International Singer-Songwriter Sahffi & Her Band, Flamenco with Ricardo Marlow and Guests
  • E Faye Butler Cabaret: What A Difference A Diva Makes

2010-11: Irene Lewis, Artistic Director

  • KT Sullivan Cabaret
  • The Wiz Book by William F. Brown, Music and Lyrics by Charlie Smalls, Based on the story The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum, Directed by Irene Lewis
  • Dunkler-Related Disorders Play Lab
  • Euan Morton Cabaret
  • ReEntry by Emily Ackerman & KJ Sanchez Directed by KJ Sanchez
  • The Second City Does Baltimore A world-premiere commission, Created for Center Stage by The Second City, Additional material created by T.J. Shanoff and Megan Grano, Directed by Matt Hovde
  • The Homecoming by Harold Pinter, Directed by Irene Lewis
  • Charlotte Cohn Cabaret
  • Snow Falling on Cedars Adapted by Kevin McKeon from the novel by David Guterson, Directed by David Schweizer
  • A Walk in August Play Lab
  • E Faye Butler Cabaret
  • Crime & Punishment Adapted by Curt Columbus and Marilyn Campbell from the novel by Fyodor Dostoevsky, Directed by Jason Loewith
  • Ken Roberson Cabaret
  • Knife on Bone Play Lab

2000-2009

2009-10: Irene Lewis, Artistic Director

  • The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde, Directed by Irene Lewis
  • Judy Kaye Cabaret
  • Euan Morton Cabaret
  • The Lookingglass Theatre's production of Around the World in 80 Days, Written and Directed by Laura Eason
  • The Santaland Diaries by David Sedaris; adapted for the stage by Joe Mantello, Directed by Irene Lewis
  • Cyrano, an original adaptation by Jo Roets, Directed by David Schweizer
  • Let There Be Love by Kwame Kwei-Armah, Directed by Jeremy B. Cohen
  • Ma Rainey's Black Bottom by August Wilson, Directed by Irene Lewis
  • E. Faye Butler Cabaret
  • Working It OutDirected by Jason Loewith (Jerry and Tom by Rick Cleveland; Washed Up on the Potomac by Lynn Rosen;Hidden in this Picture by Aaron Sorkin)
  • Concert Readings (after the quake by Haruki Murakami, translated by Jay Rubin, adapted by Frank Galati, Directed by Chay Yew; Benedictus by Motti Lerner,  Seven Jewish Children: a Play for Gaza by Caryl Churchill, Only We Who Guard the Mystery Shall be Unhappy by Tony Kushner, Directed by Jason Loewith; East of Berlin by Hannah Moscovitch, Directed by Connie Grappo)

2008-09: Irene Lewis, Artistic Director

  • The Matchmaker by Thornton Wilder, Directed by Irene Lewis
  • Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? by Edward Albee, Directed by Ethan McSweeny
  • Caroline, or Change Book & Lyrics by Tony Kushner, Music by Jeanine Tesori, Directed by David Schweizer
  • Fabulation or, The Re-education of Undine by Lynn Nottage, Directed by Jackson Gay
  • Tis Pity She’s a Whore by John Ford, Directed by Irene Lewis
  • Souvenir by Stephen Temperly, Directed by Vivian Matalon
  • First Look: In10 New Play Festival, In conjunction with UMBC
  • First Look: KILLADELPHIA by Sean Christopher Lewis, Directed by Matt Slaybaugh
  • First Look: Sans-culottes in the Promised Land by Kirsten Greenidge
  • First Look: The Cobbler by Bryan Delaney

2007-08: Irene Lewis, Artistic Director

  • Arsenic & Old Lace by Joseph Kesselring, Directed by Irene Lewis
  • Hearts by Willy Holtzman, Directed by Tim Vasen
  • Joe Turner's Come and Gone by August Wilson, Directed by Derrick Sanders
  • First Look: Breathe by Javon Johnson, Directed by Dwight R. B. Cook
  • Now What?, Written & Performed by Josh Lefkowitz
  • Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead by Tom Stoppard, Directed by Irene Lewis
  • A Little Night Music by Stephen Sondheim (music and lyrics) and Hugh Wheeler (book), Directed by Mark Lamos
  • From Tel Aviv to Ramallah: A Beatbox Journey, Written & Directed by Rachel Havrelock, Performed by Yuri Lane
  • First Look: The North Pool by Rajiv Joseph, Directed by Gregg Henry
  • First Look: Puddy Tat by Lynn Rosen, Directed by Erica Gould
  • First Look: By the Way, Meet Vera Stark by Lynn Nottage, Directed by Irene Lewis
  • These Shining Lives by Melanie Marnich, Directed by David Schweizer—WORLD PREMIERE

2006-07: Irene Lewis, Artistic Director

  • The Three Sisters by Anton Chekhov, Translated by Paul Schmidt, Directed by Irene Lewis
  • Death and the Maiden by Ariel Dorfman, Directed by Lillian Groag
  • First Look: These Shining Lives by Melanie Marnich, Directed by Leigh Silverman
  • The Boys from Syracuse by Richard Rodgers (music), Lorenz Hart (lyrics), and George Abbott (book), Directed by David Schweizer
  • Help Wanted (A Personal Search for Meaningful Employment at the Start of the 21st Century), Written & Performed by Josh Lefkowitz
  • Trouble in Mind by Alice Childress, Directed by Irene Lewis
  • First Look: Voices Underwater by Abi Basch, Directed by Gavin Witt
  • First Look: Wild Black-Eyed Susans by Kara Lee Corthron, Directed by Leah C. Gardiner
  • First Look: Luna Park by Caridad Svich, Directed by Stephanie Gilman
  • Ah, Wilderness! by Eugene O'Neill, Directed by Melia Bensussen
  • Things of Dry Hours by Naomi Wallace, Directed by Kwame Kwei-Armah
  • First Look: Knife on Bone by Jerome Hairston, Directed by Dwight R.B. Cook

2005-06: Irene Lewis, Artistic Director

  • King Lear by William Shakespeare, Directed by Irene Lewis
  • Hay Fever by Noël Coward, Directed by Will Frears
  • Once on This Island by Lynn Ahrens & Stephen Flaherty, Directed & Choreographed by Kenneth Lee Roberson
  • The Murder of Isaac by Motti Lerner, Translated by Anthony Berris, Directed by Irene Lewis—U.S. PREMIERE
  • First Look: What I Heard About Iraq (a Cry for 5 Voices) by Simon Levy, Adapted from the article by Eliot Weinberger, Directed by Otis Ramsey-Zöe
  • First Look: 1001 by Jason Grote, Directed by Gavin Witt
  • August Wilson's Radio Golf, Directed by Kenny Leon
  • First Look: Killing Women by Marisa Wegrzyn, Directed by Otis Ramsey-Zöe
  • First Look: The 13 Hallucinations of Julio Rivera by Steven R. Culp, Directed by Gregg Henry
  • Crumbs from the Table of Joy by Lynn Nottage,  Directed by David Schweizer

2004–05: Irene Lewis, Artistic Director

  • Lady Windermere's Fan by Oscar Wilde, Directed by Irene Lewis
  • The Price by Arthur Miller, Directed by Will Frears
  • Elmina's Kitchen by Kwame Kwei-Armah, Directed by Marion McClinton—U.S. PREMIERE
  • Two Gentlemen of Verona by Galt MacDermot (music), John Guare (book/lyrics), and Mel Shapiro (book); Directed by Irene Lewis
  • First Look: The Moonlight Room by Tristine Skyler, Directed by Madeleine Oldham
  • First Look: Hazard County by Allison Moore, Directed by Gavin Witt
  • Permanent Collection by Thomas Gibbons, Directed by David Schweizer
  • First Look: Help Wanted (A Personal Search for Meaningful Employment at the Start of the 21st Century) Written & Performed by Josh Lefkowitz
  • First Look: Americamisfit by Dan Dietz, Directed by Trip Cullman
  • The Voysey Inheritance by Harley Granville Barker, Adapted by Gavin Witt, Directed by Irene Lewis—WORLD PREMIERE
  • First Look: Something You Did by Willy Holtzman, Directed by Irene Lewis

2003-04: Irene Lewis, Artistic Director

  • Misalliance, by George Bernard Shaw, Directed by Irene Lewis
  • First Look: The Miser, by Molière, Translation and Adaptation by James Magruder, Directed by David Schweizer
  • a.m. Sunday by Jerome Hairston, Directed by Marion McClinton
  • First Look: Crippled Sisters, by Susan Nussbaum, Directed by Judy Dennis
  • The Miser by Molière, Translation and Adaptation by James Magruder, Directed by David Schweizer—WORLD PREMIERE
  • Sweeney Todd:The Demon Barber of Fleet Street, Music and Lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, Book by Hugh Wheeler, Directed by Irene Lewis
  • First Look: Permanent Collection, by Thomas Gibbons, Directed by Irene Lewis
  • Speed-The-Plow, by David Mamet, Directed by Daniel Fish
  • Picnic, by William Inge, Directed by Irene Lewis

2002–03: Irene Lewis, Artistic Director

  • Peter Pan by J.M. Barrie, Directed by Irene Lewis
  • No Foreigners Beyond This Point by Warren Leight, Directed by Tim Vasen—WORLD PREMIERE
  • First Look: The Murder of Isaac by Motti Lerner, Directed by Irene Lewis
  • Ain't Misbehavin' by Thomas "Fats" Waller, Based on an idea by Murray Horwitz & Richard Maltby, Jr., Directed by Ken Roberson
  • First Look: Till the Break of Dawn by Danny Hoch, Directed by Danny Hoch
  • Intimate Apparel by Lynn Nottage, Directed by Kate Whoriskey—WORLD PREMIERE
  • Mary Stuart by Friedrich Schiller, Translated by Robert David MacDonald, Directed by Irene Lewis
  • The Rainmaker by N. Richard Nash, Directed by Tim Vasen

2001–02: Irene Lewis, Artistic Director

  • The Pajama Game by George Abbott & Richard Bissell (book) and Richard Adler & Jerry Ross (music/lyrics), Directed by Irene Lewis
  • A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry, Directed by Marion McClinton
  • First Look: Intimate Apparel by Lynn Nottage, Directed by Marion McClinton
  • Three Tall Women by Edward Albee, Directed by Tim Vasen
  • First Look: No Foreigners Beyond This Point by Warren Leight, Directed by Tim Vasen
  • The Winter's Tale by William Shakespeare, Directed by Irene Lewis
  • First Look: Till the Break of Dawn by Danny Hoch, Directed by Danny Hoch
  • First Look: Well by Lisa Kron, Directed by Leigh Silverman
  • Blithe Spirit by Noël Coward, Directed by Tim Vasen
  • The Foundry Theatre's Production of And God Created Great Whales by Rinde Eckert, Directed by David Schweizer

2000–01: Irene Lewis, Artistic Director

  • She Stoops to Conquer by Oliver Goldsmith, Directed by Irene Lewis
  • Fall by Bridget Carpenter, Directed by Lisa Peterson
  • Short Plays by Thornton Wilder, Directed by Tim Vasen
  • The Investigation by Peter Weiss, Directed by Irene Lewis
  • Dinah Was by Oliver Goldstick, Directed by David Petrarca
  • The Piano Lesson by August Wilson, Directed by Reggie Montgomery
  • Off Center: Another American: Asking and Telling by Marc Wolf
  • Off Center: Morning, Noon, and Night by Spalding Gray
  • Off Center: The No Black Male Show by Carl Hancock Rux

1990-1999

1999-2000: Irene Lewis, Artistic Director

  • An Ideal Husband by Oscar Wilde, Directed by Irene Lewis
  • Griller by Eric Bogosian, Directed by David Warren
  • for colored girls who have considered suicide/when the rainbow is enuf by Ntozake Shange, Directed by George Faison
  • The Hostage by Brendan Behan, Directed by Irene Lewis
  • Macbeth by William Shakespeare, Directed by Tim Vasen
  • The Gimmick by Dael Orlandersmith, Directed by Chris Coleman
  • 2.5 Minute Ride by Lisa Kron, Directed by Mark Brokaw
  • Off Center: Sharps, Flats & Accidentals by The Flying Karamazov Brothers
  • Off Center: To the Top! Top! Top! by Hazelle Goodman
  • Off Center: Spray by Mike Albo

1998-99: Irene Lewis, Artistic Director

  • Travels with My Aunt by Graham Greene, Adapted by Giles Havergal, Directed by Tim Vasen
  • As You Like It by William Shakespeare, Directed by Irene Lewis
  • Jitney by August Wilson, Directed by Marion McClinton
  • An Almost Holy Picture by Heather McDonald, Directed by Tim Vasen
  • Gum by Karen Hartman, Directed by Tim Vasen—WORLD PREMIERE
  • Mrs. Warren's Profession by George Bernard Shaw, Directed by Irene Lewis
  • I Could Stop on a Dime and Get Ten Cents Change by Dianne McIntyre, Directed by Dianne McIntyre

1997-98: Irene Lewis, Artistic Director

  • A Midsummer Night's Dream by William Shakespeare, Directed by Irene Lewis
  • Splash Hatch on the E Going Down by Kia Corthron, Directed by Marion McClinton
  • Les Blancs by Lorraine Hansberry, Directed by Marion McClinton
  • H.M.S. Pinafore by Gilbert & Sullivan, Directed by Irene Lewis
  • The Woman in Black by Stephen Mallatratt, From the book by Susan Hill, Directed by Tim Vasen
  • How I Learned to Drive by Paula Vogel, Directed by Barry Edelstein
  • Off Center: yousaywhatimeanbutwhatyoumeanisnotwhatisaid by Hot Mouth
  • Off Center: The Vagina Monologues by Eve Ensler
  • Off Center: Evolution of a Homeboy: Jails, Hospitals & Hip Hop by Danny Hoch
  • Off Center: Quasar Looming by Ntozake Shange
  • Off Center: A Huey P. Newton Story by Roger Guenveur Smith
  • Off Center: Beauty's Daughter and Monster by Dael Orlandersmith

1996-97: Irene Lewis, Artistic Director

  • Galileo by Bertolt Brecht, Directed by Irene Lewis
  • Triumph of Love by James Magruder (book), Susan Birkenhead (lyrics), & Jeffrey Stock (music), Directed by Michael Mayer—WORLD PREMIERE
  • Thunder Knocking on the Door by Keith Glover, Directed by Marion McClinton—WORLD PREMIERE
  • Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare, Directed by Irene Lewis
  • The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams, Directed by Tim Vasen
  • Seven Guitars by August Wilson, Directed by Marion McClinton
  • Off Center: A Huey P. Newton Story by Roger Guenveur Smith, Directed by Roger Guenveur Smith

1995-96: Irene Lewis, Artistic Director

  • Don Juan by Molière, Adapted by Christopher Hampton, Directed by Irene Lewis
  • Day of Absence by Douglas Turner Ward, Directed by Marion McClinton
  • Open Admissions by Shirley Lauro, Directed by Tim Vasen
  • The Taming of the Shrew by William Shakespeare, Directed by Jackson Phippin
  • The Lover by Elizabeth Egloff, Directed by Irene Lewis—WORLD PREMIERE
  • Spunk by Zora Neale Hurston, Adapted by George C. Wolfe, Directed by Seret Scott
  • Private Lives by Noël Coward, Directed by Irene Lewis
  • Off Center: Wake Up & Smell the Coffee by Eric Bogosian, Directed by Joe Bonney
  • Off Center: Live from the Great White Way by Dick Gregory, Directed by Dick Gregory

1994-95: Irene Lewis, Artistic Director

  • The Cherry Orchard by Anton Chekhov, Directed by Irene Lewis
  • Two Trains Running by August Wilson, Directed by Marion McClinton
  • Slavs! (Thinking About the Longstanding Problems of Virtue and Happiness) by Tony Kushner, Directed by Lisa Peterson
  • Happy End by Bertolt Brecht (book/lyrics) & Kurt Weill (music), Directed by Irene Lewis
  • Feminine Singular: Citizen Reno by Reno, Directed by Tina Landau
  • Feminine Singular: Big Butt Girls, Hard-Headed Women by Rhodessa Jones, Directed by Idris Ackamoor
  • Feminine Singular: Hannah Senesh by David Schechter, Directed by David Schechter
  • The Show-Off by George Kelly, Directed by Irene Lewis
  • Off Center: Pounding Nails in the Floor with My Forehead by Eric Bogosian, Directed by Jo Bonney
  • Off Center: Fires in the Mirror by Anna Deavere Smith, Directed by George C. Wolfe

1993-94: Irene Lewis, Artistic Director

  • The Triumph of Love by Marivaux, Adapted by James Magruder, Directed by Irene Lewis
  • Fences by August Wilson, Directed by Donald Douglass
  • Das Barbecü by Jim Luigs (book/lyrics) & Scott Warrender (music), Directed by Christopher Ashley
  • Othello by William Shakespeare, Directed by Irene Lewis
  • The Loman Family Picnic by Donald Margulies, Directed by Michael Greif
  • Ghosts by Henrik Ibsen, Directed by Irene Lewis
  • Off Center: Caged with Wog by Mump Smoot, Directed by Karen Hines
  • Off Center: Big Butt Girls, Hard-Headed Women by Rhodessa Jones, Directed by Idris Ackamoor
  • Off Center: Gray's Anatomy by Spalding Gray, Directed by Renee Shafransky

1992-93: Irene Lewis, Artistic Director

  • Servant of Two Masters by Carlo Goldoni, Directed by Irene Lewis
  • T Bone N Weasel by Jon Klein, Directed by Jackson Phippin
  • A Moon for the Misbegotten by Eugene O'Neill, Directed by Lisa Peterson
  • Escape from Happiness by George F. Walker, Directed by Irene Lewis
  • Lady Day at Emerson's Bar & Grill by Lanie Robertson, Directed by George Faison
  • Arms and the Man by George Bernard Shaw, Directed by Irene Lewis

1991-92: Irene Lewis, Artistic Director

  • The Queen and the Rebels by Ugo Betti, Directed by Irene Lewis
  • My Children! My Africa! by Athol Fugard, Directed by Lisa Peterson
  • A Doll House by Henrik Ibsen, Directed by Jackson Phippin
  • Pericles, Prince of Tyre by William Shakespeare, Directed by Irene Lewis
  • Police Boys by Marion McClinton, Directed by Marion McClinton—WORLD PREMIERE
  • The Baltimore Waltz by Paula Vogel, Directed by Michael Greif
  • The Misanthrope by Molière, Directed by Irene Lewis

1990-91: Stan Wojewodski, Jr., Artistic Director

  • Ma Rainey's Black Bottom by August Wilson, Directed by L. Kenneth Richardson
  • O Pioneers! by Darrah Cloud (book) & Kim D. Sherman (music), based on the novel by Willa Cather, Directed by Stan Wojewodski, Jr.
  • Candida by George Bernard Shaw, Directed by Rick Davis
  • The Heliotrope Bouquet by Scott Joplin and Louis Chauvin by Eric Overmyer, Directed by Stan Wojewodski, Jr.—WORLD PREMIERE
  • Twelfth Night by William Shakespeare, Directed by Irene Lewis
  • The Mystery of Irma Vep by Charles Ludlam, Directed by Stan Wojewodski, Jr.

1980-1989

1989-90: Stan Wojewodski, Jr., Artistic Director

  • Man and Superman by George Bernard Shaw, Directed by Stan Wojewodski, Jr.
  • Miss Evers' Boys by David Feldshuh, Directed by Irene Lewis—WORLD PREMIERE
  • The Film Society by Jon Robin Baitz, Directed by Jackson Phippin
  • An Enemy of the People by Henrik Ibsen, Directed by Stan Wojewodski, Jr.
  • All's Well That Ends Well by William Shakespeare, Directed by Stan Wojewodski, Jr.
  • The Making of Americans by Gertrude Stein, Directed by Lawrence Kornfeld
  • Beckett: Short Works by Samuel Beckett, Directed by Jackson Phippin & Cheryl Faver

1988-89: Stan Wojewodski, Jr., Artistic Director

  • The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde, Directed by Stan Wojewodski, Jr.
  • Fool for Love by Sam Shepard, Directed by William Foeller
  • Joe Turner's Come and Gone by August Wilson, Directed by Irene Lewis
  • The Tempest by William Shakespeare, Directed by Stan Wojewodski, Jr.
  • There's One in Every Marriage by Georges Feydeau, Directed by Stan Wojewodski, Jr.
  • The Broken Pitcher by Heinrich von Kleist, Directed by Michael Engler
  • The Increased Difficulty of Concentration by Vaclav Havel, Directed by Stan Wojewodski, Jr.

1987-88: Stan Wojewodski, Jr., Artistic Director

  • Hamlet by William Shakespeare, Directed by Stan Wojewodski, Jr.
  • Aunt Dan and Lemon by Wallace Shawn, Directed by Irene Lewis
  • The Colored Museum by George C. Wolfe, Directed by L. Kenneth Richardson
  • Paradise Lost by Clifford Odets, Directed by Michael Engler
  • The Lady from the Sea by Henrik Ibsen, Translated by Rolf Fjelde, Directed by Stan Wojewodski, Jr.
  • In Perpetuity Throughout the Universe by Eric Overmyer, Directed by Stan Wojewodski, Jr.—WORLD PREMIERE
  • Judgment Day by Odon von Horvath, Directed by Jackson Phippin
  • A Temporary Place by Frederick Gaines, Directed by Irene Lewis—WORLD PREMIERE

1986-87: Stan Wojewodski, Jr., Artistic Director

  • Present Laughter by Noël Coward, Directed by Norman René
  • A Map of the World by David Hare, Directed by Stan Wojewodski, Jr.
  • Roza by Julian More (book/lyrics) & Gilbert Becaud (music), Directed by Harold Prince—WORLD PREMIERE
  • Uncle Vanya by Anton Chekhov, Translated by Ronald Hingley, Additional translation and adaptation by Rick Davis and Irene Lewis, Directed by Irene Lewis
  • The Marriage of Bette and Boo by Christopher Durang, Directed by Richard Hamburger
  • Major Barbara by George Bernard Shaw, Directed by Stan Wojewodski, Jr.

1985-86: Stan Wojewodski, Jr., Artistic Director

  • She Loves Me by Jerry Bock (music), Sheldon Harnick (lyrics), & Joe Masteroff (book), Based on a play by Miklos Laszlo, Directed by Stan Wojewodski, Jr.
  • Boesman and Lena by Athol Fugard, Directed by Zakes Mokae
  • Bedroom Farce by Alan Ayckbourn, Directed by Stan Wojewodski, Jr.
  • The Normal Heart by Larry Kramer, Directed by Michael Engler
  • The School for Wives by Molière, Directed by Irene Lewis
  • Buried Child by Sam Shepard, Directed by Michael Engler
  • In a Pig's Valise by Eric Overmyer, Directed by Mark Harrison—WORLD PREMIERE
  • Deadfall by Grace McKeaney, Directed by Stan Wojewodski, Jr.—WORLD PREMIERE
  • Reunion by Sybille Pearson, Directed by Irene Lewis—WORLD PREMIERE

1984-85: Stan Wojewodski, Jr., Artistic Director

  • Danton's Death by Georg Büchner, Directed by Stan Wojewodski, Jr.
  • Henry IV, Part 1 by William Shakespeare, Directed by Stan Wojewodski, Jr.
  • Execution of Justice by Emily Mann, Directed by Stan Wojewodski, Jr.
  • On the Verge or the Geography of Yearning by Eric Overmyer, Directed by Jackson Phippin—WORLD PREMIERE
  • Native Speech by Eric Overmyer, Directed by Paul Berman—WORLD PREMIERE
  • Hedda Gabler by Henrik Ibsen, Adapted by Kenneth Cavander, Directed by Irene Lewis
  • Who They Are and How It Is With Them by Grace McKeaney, Directed by Jackson Phippin—WORLD PREMIERE
  • A Flea in Her Ear by Georges Feydeau, Adapted by Roy Brocksmith, Directed by Roy Brocksmith
  • Painting Churches by Tina Howe, Directed by Stan Wojewodski, Jr.

1983-84: Stan Wojewodski, Jr., Artistic Director

  • Crossing the Bar by Michael Zettler, Directed by Stephen Zuckerman
  • Our Town by Thornton Wilder, Directed by Jackson Phippin
  • The Sleep of Reason by Antonio Buero-Vallejo, Translated by Marion Peter Holt, Directed by Travis Preston—U.S. PREMIERE
  • You Never Can Tell by George Bernard Shaw, Directed by Stan Wojewodski, Jr.
  • Another Part of the Forest by Lillian Hellman, Directed by Irene Lewis
  • Ohio Tip-Off by James Yoshimura, Directed by John Pasquin—WORLD PREMIERE

1982-83: Stan Wojewodski, Jr., Artistic Director

  • Last Looks by Grace McKeaney, Directed by Jackson Phippin—WORLD PREMIERE
  • The Miser by Molière, Directed by Stan Wojewodski, Jr.
  • Division Street by Steve Tesich, Directed by Stan Wojewodski, Jr.
  • Wings by Arthur Kopit, Directed by Stan Wojewodski, Jr.
  • The Woman by Edward Bond, Directed by Jackson Phippin
  • Love's Labor's Lost by William Shakespeare, Directed by Stan Wojewodski, Jr.

1981-82: Stan Wojewodski, Jr., Artistic Director

  • A Lesson from Aloes by Athol Fugard, Directed by Jackson Phippin
  • Much Ado About Nothing by William Shakespeare, Directed by Stan Wojewodski, Jr.
  • The Amen Corner by James Baldwin, Directed by Walter Dallas
  • The Workroom (L'Atelier) by Jean-Claude Grumberg, Directed by Stan Wojewodski, Jr.
  • Terra Nova by Ted Tally, Directed by Stan Wojewodski, Jr.
  • Savages by Christopher Hampton, Directed by Jackson Phippin

1980-81: Stan Wojewodski, Jr., Artistic Director

  • The Front Page by Ben Hecht & Charles MacArthur, Directed by Stan Wojewodski, Jr.
  • Agnes of God by John Pielmeier, Directed by Stan Wojewodski, Jr.
  • The Duenna by Richard Brinsley Sheridan, Adapted & Composed by Lance Mulcahy, Directed by Garland Wright—WORLD PREMIERE
  • A Man for All Seasons by Robert Bolt, Directed by Geoffrey Sherman
  • Sally's Gone, She Left Her Name by Russell Davis, Directed by Stan Wojewodski, Jr.—WORLD PREMIERE
  • Inherit the Wind by Jerome Lawrence & Robert E. Lee, Directed by Jackson Phippin

1970-1979

1979-80: Stan Wojewodski, Jr., Artistic Director

  • Mother Courage and Her Children by Bertolt Brecht, Directed by Stan Wojewodski, Jr.
  • Pvt. Wars and Lone Star by James McLure, Directed by Stan Wojewodski, Jr.
  • A Christmas Carol: Scrooge & Marley by Charles Dickens, Adapted by Israel Horovitz, Directed by Jackson Phippin
  • Watch on the Rhine by Lillian Hellman, Directed by Irene Lewis
  • A Day in the Death of Joe Egg by Peter Nichols, Directed by Jackson Phippin
  • Crimes of the Heart by Beth Henley, Directed by J Ranelli
  • Cyrano de Bergerac by Edmond de Rostand, Adapted by Anthony Burgess, Directed by Stan Wojewodski, Jr.

1978-79: Stan Wojewodski, Jr., Artistic Director

  • The Shadow Box by Michael Cristofer, Directed by Stan Wojewodski, Jr.
  • Born Yesterday by Garson Kanin, Directed by Steven Robman
  • A Christmas Carol: Scrooge & Marley by Charles Dickens, Adapted by Israel Horovitz, Directed by Robert Allan Ackerman—WORLD PREMIERE
  • G. R. Point by David Berry, Directed by William Devane
  • You Can't Take It With You by George S. Kaufman & Moss Hart, Directed by Stan Wojewodski, Jr.
  • Measure for Measure by William Shakespeare, Directed by Stan Wojewodski, Jr.
  • Bonjour la Bonjour by Michel Tremblay, Directed by Stan Wojewodski, Jr.

1977-78: Stan Wojewodski, Jr., Artistic Director

  • The Good-bye People by Herb Gardner, Directed by Robert Allan Ackerman
  • The Rivals by Richard Brinsley Sheridan, Directed by Stan Wojewodski, Jr.
  • The Runner Stumbles by Milan Stitt, Directed by Stan Wojewodski, Jr.
  • The Night of the Iguana by Tennessee Williams, Directed by Edward Berkeley
  • Ashes by David Rudkin, Directed by Stan Wojewodski, Jr.
  • Blithe Spirit by Noël Coward, Directed by Marcia Rodd

1976-77: Stan Wojewodski, Jr., Artistic Director

  • She Stoops to Conquer by Oliver Goldsmith, Directed by Stan Wojewodski, Jr.
  • When You Comin' Back Red Ryder? by Mark Medoff, Directed by Stan Wojewodski, Jr.
  • Misalliance by George Bernard Shaw, Directed by Arne Zaslove
  • Toys in the Attic by Lillian Hellman, Directed by Stan Wojewodski, Jr.
  • The First Breeze of Summer by Leslie Lee, Directed by Woodie King, Jr.
  • Knock, Knock by Jules Feiffer, Directed by John Henry Davis
  • A Sorrow Beyond Dreams by Peter Handke, Directed by Daniel Freudenberger

1975-76: Stan Wojewodski, Jr., Artistic Director

  • Tartuffe by Molière, Directed by Jacques Cartier
  • Busy Bee Good Food All Night Delicious Borders by Charles Eastman, Directed by Charles Eastman—WORLD PREMIERE
  • Dream on Monkey Mountain by Derek Walcott, Directed by Albert Laveau
  • Old Times by Harold Pinter, Directed by Stan Wojewodski, Jr.
  • The Cherry Orchard by Anton Chekhov, Directed by Jacques Cartier
  • The Real Inspector Hound by Tom Stoppard and Black Comedy by Peter Shaffer, Directed by Stan Wojewodski, Jr.

1974-75: Jacques Cartier, Artistic Director

  • Touring productions only.

1973-74: Jacques Cartier, Artistic Director

  • The Hot l Baltimore by Lanford Wilson, Directed by John Stix
  • Uncle Vanya by Anton Chekhov, Directed by Jacques Cartier
  • Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? by Edward Albee, Directed by John Stix
  • Hay Fever by Noël Coward, Directed by Jacques Cartier
  • A View from the Bridge by Arthur Miller, Directed by Michael Murray
  • Happy Birthday, Wanda June by Kurt Vonnegut, Jr., Directed by Carl Schurr

1972-73: John Stix, Artistic Director

  • One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Dale Wasserman, Directed by John Stix
  • Dandy Dick by Arthur Wing Pinero, Directed by John Stix
  • Two Saints ("story theater") by Isaac Bashevis Singer/Gustave Flaubert, Directed by Larry Arrick
  • Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare, Directed by Mitchell Nestor
  • The Petrified Forest by Robert E. Sherwood, Directed by John Stix
  • The Me Nobody Knows by Livingston & Schapiro, Directed by Robert H. Livingston

1971-72: John Stix, Artistic Director

  • The Trial of the Catonsville Nine by Daniel Berrigan, S.J., Directed by John Stix
  • The Seagull by Anton Chekhov, Directed by Robert Lewis
  • The Beaux' Strategem by George Farquhar, Directed by John Lithgow
  • Andorra by Max Frisch, Directed by John Stix
  • Staircase by Charles Dyer, Directed by Alfred Ryder
  • Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller, Directed by Lee D. Sankowich

1970-71: John Stix, Artistic Director

  • A Cry of Players by William Gibson, Directed by John Stix
  • Marat/Sade by Peter Weiss, Directed by Peter W. Culman
  • Twelfth Night by William Shakespeare, Directed by Sheldon Patinkin
  • The Lover and The Collection by Harold Pinter, Directed by Robert Lewis
  • Ceremonies in Dark Old Men by Lonnie Elder III, Directed by Richard Ward
  • Fire in the Mindhouse by Arnold Borget (book/lyrics) and Lance Mulcahy (music), Directed by John Stix—WORLD PREMIERE

1962-1969

1969-70: Peter Culman, Executive Director

  • Slow Dance on the Killing Ground by William Hanley, Directed by John Stix
  • The Knack by Ann Jellicoe, Directed by Dennis Rosa
  • Long Day's Journey into Night by Eugene O'Neill, Directed by Ben Piazza
  • The Tempest by William Shakespeare, Directed by Dennis Rosa
  • Park by Paul Cherry (book/lyrics) & Lance Mulcahy (music), Directed by John Stix—WORLD PREMIERE
  • The Indian Wants the Bronx by Israel Horovitz, Directed by Lee Theodore
  • The Gnadiges Fraulein by Tennessee Williams, Directed by Lee Theodore
  • Who's Got His Own by Ron Milner, Directed by Nathan George
  • The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams, Directed by Peter W. Culman

1968-69: Peter Culman, Executive Director

  • Boy Meets Girl by Bella & Samuel Spewack, Directed by Ruth White
  • The Journey of the Fifth Horse by Ronald Ribman, Directed by John Stix
  • The Homecoming by Harold Pinter, Directed by Kent Paul
  • The Merchant of Venice by William Shakespeare, Directed by John Olon-Scrymgeour
  • Bonus March by Willace Hamilton, Directed by Dennis Rosa
  • The Skin of Our Teeth by Thornton Wilder, Directed by John Olon-Scrymgeour
  • A Doll's House by Henrik Ibsen, Directed by John Stix

1967-68: Douglas Seale, Artistic Director

  • Waiting for Godot by Samuel Beckett, Directed by Ronald L. Hufham
  • The Member of the Wedding by Carson McCullers, Directed by John Olon-Scrymgeour
  • Hamlet by William Shakespeare, Directed by Douglas Seale
  • The Devil's Disciple by George Bernard Shaw, Directed by Douglas Seale
  • An Enemy of the People by Henrik Ibsen, Adapted by Arthur Miller, Directed by Leonard Cimino
  • The Royal Family by George S. Kaufman & Edna Ferber, Directed by Douglas Seale
  • Et Cetera '68 (a musical revue) by various authors, Directed by John Olon-Scrymgeour

1966-67: Douglas Seale, Artistic Director

  • The Miser by Molière, Directed by Rod Alexander
  • The Death of Bessie Smith by Edward Albee, Directed by Richard Gillespie
  • Benito Cereno by Robert Lowell, Directed by Patrick Tovatt
  • Lady Audley's Secret by Douglas Seale, Directed by Douglas Seale—WORLD PREMIERE
  • The Balcony by Jean Genet, Directed by Brooks Jones
  • Titus Andronicus by William Shakespeare, Directed by Douglas Seale
  • Noah by Andre Obey, Directed by Douglas Seale
  • A Penny for a Song by John Whiting, Directed by Douglas Seale

1965-66: Douglas Seale, Artistic Director

  • Caesar and Cleopatra by George Bernard Shaw, Directed by Douglas Seale
  • The Tavern by George M. Cohan, Directed by John Marley
  • Ardele by Jean Anouilh, Directed by Douglas Seale
  • The Birthday Party by Harold Pinter, Directed by Brooks Jones
  • The Days Between by Robert Anderson, Directed by Douglas Seale
  • The Chinese Wall by Max Frisch, Directed by Douglas Seale
  • As You Like It by William Shakespeare, Directed by Douglas Seale

1964-65: Ed Golden, Artistic Director

  • The Hostage by Brendan Behan, Directed by Mesrop Kesdekian
  • The Country Wife by William Wycherley, Directed by Edward Golden
  • Galileo by Bertolt Brecht, Directed by John Marley
  • The Doctor's Dilemma by George Bernard Shaw, Directed by John Olon-Scrymgeour
  • A Touch of the Poet by Eugene O'Neill, Directed by Edward Golden
  • The Physicists by Friedrich Durrenmatt, Directed by Edward Golden
  • Six Characters in Search of an Author by Luigi Pirandello, Directed by John Olon-Scrymgeour
  • The Lady's Not for Burning by Christopher Fry, Directed by Edward Golden

1963-64: Ed Golden, Artistic Director

  • Light Up the Sky by Moss Hart, Directed by Edward Golden
  • Summer of the Seventeenth Doll by Ray Lawler, Directed by Edward Golden
  • The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde
  • Silent Night, Lonely Night by Robert Anderson, Directed by Edward Golden
  • Portrait of a Madonna by Tennessee Williams, Directed by Edward Golden
  • The Respectful Prostitute by Jean-Paul Sartre, Directed by Edward Golden
  • The Room and Five Sketches by Harold Pinter
  • A Shot in the Dark by Marcel Achard & Harry Kurnitz
  • U.S.Aby John Dos Passos & Paul Shyre, Directed by Edward Golden
  • Anna Christie by Eugene O'Neill, Directed by Edward Golden
  • Bedtime Story and The Shadow of a Gunman by Sean O'Casey, Directed by Kenneth Costigan
  • Twelfth Night by William Shakespeare, Directed by Bernard Hiatt

1962-63: Ed Golden, Artistic Director

  • La Ronde by Arthur Schnitzler, Directed by Edward Golden
  • You Touched Me! by Tennessee Williams & Donald Windham, Directed by Edward Golden
  • The Maids by Jean Genet, Directed by Edward Golden
  • The Zoo Story by Edward Albee, Directed by Edward Golden
  • Arms and the Man by George Bernard Shaw, Directed by Edward Golden
  • Beyond the Horizon by Eugene O'Neill
  • Amphitryon 38 by Jean Giraudoux, Directed by Edward Golden
  • The Mousetrap by Agatha Christie
  • The Chairs and The Lesson by Eugene Ionesco, Directed by Edward Golden